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  • Writer's pictureScott Harkness

Excavation/Shotcrete Encroachment Analysis and Deformation Monitoring using 3D Scanning: A Game Changer in the Construction Industry



The construction industry has evolved over the years, thanks to the innovative technologies that have emerged. The use of 3D scanning for excavation/shotcrete encroachment analysis and deformation monitoring has proved to be a game-changer in the construction process. It is an effective way of monitoring and managing the excavation and shotcrete shoring activities, allowing for precision, accuracy, and accountability throughout the build process.


At Van Bower, we have leveraged the power of 3D scanning technology to provide our esteemed clients with highly detailed reports that outline the proper locations of excavation walls and shotcrete installation. These reports use detailed heatmaps to show any location deviation from design. We believe that this technology has revolutionized the way construction companies approach excavation and shotcrete shoring activities by enhancing the accuracy of the entire process.


What is 3D Scanning?


3D scanning technology makes use of laser light to capture the detailed physical features of an object or surface in three dimensions. It creates highly accurate representations of structures, allowing for accurate measurement and analysis. In the construction industry context, 3D scanning makes construction monitoring processes more efficient and effective.



Why is Excavation/Shotcrete Encroachment Analysis and Deformation Monitoring important?


Excavation and shotcrete shoring activities are some of the most crucial aspects of construction. They set the foundation for the rest of the building process. Accurate monitoring of these activities is an essential step in ensuring the construction project's overall success. A failure to monitor the excavation and shotcrete shoring activities can lead to deformations, settlement, or even collapse of a structure. Additionally, excavation and shoring activities have the potential to encroach on adjacent structures or properties, leading to conflicts and other legal issues.


With 3D scanning technology, Van Bower can provide valuable information on the proper locations of excavation walls and shotcrete installation, ensuring that there is minimal encroachment into the adjacent properties. The technology also provides comprehensive cut/fill information to see exactly how much encroachment there may be and can even provide volume calculations. This information helps the construction team to make informed decisions and take corrective action wherever necessary, ensuring the overall safety of the construction project and avoiding legal issues.




How does 3D Scanning aid in Deformation Monitoring?


With 3D scanning technology, we can provide a more robust monitoring process during excavation and shotcrete shoring activities. By scanning the excavation walls and shotcrete installation, we can obtain a highly accurate representation of the surfaces' physical features. This allows for a precise measurement of the deformations and movements that can occur during the building process.


The heatmaps generated through 3D scanning technology provide an accurate representation of the deviations that may occur during excavation and shotcrete shoring activities. These deviations can then be analyzed and corrected, ensuring that the construction process stays on track and any problems are addressed promptly.



In conclusion, 3D scanning technology has provided an effective way of managing and monitoring excavation and shotcrete shoring activities, making the construction process more efficient and effective. It has revolutionized the way construction companies approach excavation activities by enhancing the accuracy of the entire process. By using Van Bower's excavation and shotcrete shoring encroachment analysis and deformation monitoring services, construction companies can ensure the safe and successful completion of their projects knowing their good from the foundation up.

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